Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: 96 Crucial Omissions

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These are just 6 of the worthy acts who are still on the outside looking in

This Thursday, Oct. 5, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame will announce the nominees for its Class of 2018. It’s an important step, but just the first, for acts to be selected. The choices are expected to be made in December once they’re voted on by the official committee, plus the fan vote.

Last Dec. 20, the Rock Hall announced its 2017 class of inductees: Joan Baez, Electric Light Orchestra, Journey, Pearl Jam, Tupac Shakur and Yes. The Hall also announced that it would give a special Award for Music Excellence to Nile Rodgers, founder of Chic.

In Fall 2016, we put together a list of artists that deserve consideration for induction. Our original list of 100 omissions included Baez, ELO, Journey, Yes and Chic.

[There are so many others that we’ve written Part 2 of our list of HoF omissions, which includes another 100 artists that have thus far been snubbed. Click the link at the end of this story.]

For this list we concentrated solely on artists who made their first recording prior to 1980. Thus, several of the 2017 nominees and inductees (Pearl Jam, Tupac, etc.) were not included.

Rock Hall

Since the Hall’s inception, music fans have argued over who should be in, who shouldn’t be, why and why not? Lists abound online and there is almost never any consensus.

Below we present a list of our own: 96 artists we think deserve nomination. Our reasons for selecting them vary. One factor we considered in particular is whether they were important in their own time, not only how they are regarded today. Some will eventually make the Hall’s cut, others never will, and that’s just how it is. You will undoubtedly agree with some of our picks and we can already hear you shouting,“I can’t believe they left out (fill in the blank)!” Feel free to offer your comments.

In order to be eligible, an artist must have made their first recording 25 years prior to the current year (for the 2018 class, that means 1993). But for our purposes, we’re going to put the ’80s and ’90s artists aside, because there are still so many from the ’50s-’70s that haven’t been nominated yet. All of our picks made their debut recording earlier than 1980.

Perhaps some of these pre-’80s artists will finally get nomination nods this week. Most, of course, will not. There are usually some surprises. Few expected to see Chicago or Steve Miller nominated because they were never critics’ favorites, and music critics make up a good percentage of the nominating committee. Yet both were nominated and were ultimately inducted this year. On the other hand, some artists who are favored by music biz people but not particularly by the public seem to get nominated over and over until they finally get in.

Oh, and we’re only scratching the surface here. This list was winnowed down from more than 150 names on our master list.

One other note: This list considers only artists who recorded primarily under their own names. This is the only category that is submitted to the voting body each year. Thus it does not include musicians who have served primarily as “sidemen” or “sidewomen.” Some of the greatest musicians in rock history have never received the recognition they deserve because they contribute mostly to others’ recordings. The Hall of Fame has a separate sideman category, to which it occasionally appoints names its executives deem worthy. As those artists are not submitted for consideration to voters, we are not concerning ourselves with them here.

Names are listed alphabetically

The Association—Their ballads “Cherish” and “Never My Love” are among the most played songs in history. And “Along Comes Mary” is another classic.

Bad Company—Singer Paul Rodgers should also be in for the band Free too, but we’ll settle for these crunching power-rockers.

Badfinger—They have a tragic story but such great songs—and Beatle-approved, too.

Blue Öyster Cult—Hard-rock meets prog with lots of pre-punk attitude.

Blues Project—The New York quintet was tremendously influential. Keyboardist/vocalist Al Kooper and guitarist Danny Kalb were superb instrumentalists.

Kate Bush—One of the most innovative and individualistic singer-songwriters around.

Jerry Butler—Already in with the Impressions, but like Curtis Mayfield the R&B great’s solo work is vital.

Glen Campbell—Yes, he was usually tagged as country-pop, but for his session work alone (Spector, Beach Boys, Monkees) he should go in. Plus, he played a killer guitar.

Canned Heat—One of the great blues-rock bands of the ’60s. The real deal. Here they are at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival.

Captain Beefheart—Never sold any records but had a tremendous influence on other experimental rockers.

The Carpenters—Some may say they’re too lightweight to be considered rock but Karen Carpenter’s voice is a thing of beauty, and they made wonderful pop records.

Chubby Checker—He took “The Twist” to #1 twice, in two different years. Give the man his due already!

Cher—Is she rock? Probably more so than Madonna, who’s been inducted. And let’s not forget those good times with Sonny.

Joe Cocker—That voice! That thing he did with his hands! A master interpreter of songs. Did we mention that voice?

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Judy Collins—More than just another talented folk singer, she was one of the artists who defined her generation.

Ry Cooder—For his guitar work alone he should be enshrined. Add his work as solo artist and producer, and it’s a no-brainer.

Country Joe and the Fish—San Francisco psychedelia met Berkeley social commentary in the ’60s. They were ubiquitous at festivals and on radio.

Jim Croce—His life was cut short before he had a chance to truly develop but the trove of hits he left behind was substantial.

The Crystals—Even more than the Ronettes, the Crystals were Phil Spector’s go-to girl group. Darlene Love and La La Brooks were (and still are) dynamic singers.

Dick Dale—The man invented surf guitar. That’s enough. Check out his version of “Misirlou” below.

The Damned—The first bona fide British punk band, who later expanded their sound.

The Doobie Brothers—A ton of well-crafted hits, some before and then more when Michael McDonald came aboard, and they still hold up well.

Lee Dorsey—The great New Orleans R&B hitmaker. Induct him for “Working in the Coal Mine” alone.

Emerson, Lake and Palmer—Prog-rock virtuosity and over-the-top showmanship all condensed into a powerful little package.

Fairport Convention—Two words: Richard Thompson. Two more: Sandy Denny. No other band defined English folk-rock like Fairport.

Marianne Faithfull—From Stones-associated chanteuse she reinvented herself as world-weary interpreter of the first order.

Flying Burrito Brothers—One of the seminal country-rock bands. Criminally overlooked.

Peter Frampton—Beside creating one of the best-selling albums ever (Frampton Comes Alive), he’s a monster guitarist and engaging showman.

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 08: Rick Nielsen of Cheap Trick performs onstage at the 31st Annual Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony at Barclays Center of Brooklyn on April 8, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Kevin Kane/WireImage for Rock and Roll Hall of Fame)

Rick Nielsen of Cheap Trick performs onstage at the 2016 induction ceremony in Brooklyn. (Photo by Kevin Kane/WireImage for Rock and Roll Hall of Fame)

Related: Meet the 2016 Rock Hall inductees 

J. Geils Band—Killer live band fronted by the dynamic Peter Wolf. In their heyday they were always the best show in town. Hits included “Centerfold” and “Love Stinks.”

Lesley Gore—“It’s My Party,” “You Don’t Own Me” and so many more hits. She was every teenage girl’s BFF in the ’60s.

Grand Funk Railroad—One of the first truly divisive rock bands, but love ’em or hate ’em you can’t deny they helped popularize hard rock.

The Grass Roots—Easy to forget them until you look at their long string of smashes: “Midnight Confessions,” “Let’s Live for Today,” “Temptation Eyes” and many more.

The Guess Who—The Canadian band led by Burton Cummings and Randy Bachman was another hit machine: “American Woman,” “These Eyes,” “No Sugar Tonight,” etc.

Richie Havens—One of the most distinctive voices ever, he made every song he covered his own. And he opened the Woodstock fest.

Herman’s Hermits—They weren’t popular only because singer Peter Noone was “cute.” They also made many durable pop hits.

Humble Pie—Steve Marriott is already in with Small Faces but his second great band is equally deserving. These guys seriously rocked. Watch them below.

Tommy James and the Shondells—“Crimson and Clover,” “Crystal Blue Persuasion” and, of course, “Hanky Panky.” So many hits, all very diverse.

Jan and Dean—The surf duo was overshadowed by their colleagues the Beach Boys but for a few years they were massive.

Jethro Tull—Their detractors will never understand why, but Ian Anderson and the band sold tons of records and were a major concert act for years.

Tom Jones—Forget about the schlocky stuff—on the strength of his voice, this masterful interpreter of songs belongs in. As a live performer, he’s better than ever now, and his past few albums have been spectacular.

Watch Tom Jones sing “Show Me,” a song made famous by another artist on our list, Joe Tex.

Judas Priest—Of all the early metal bands still out in the cold, the omission of these Brits is the most egregious.

Ben E. King—Inducted as a member of the Drifters, but his solo output includes “Stand By Me” and “Spanish Harlem.” He needs his own slot in the Hall.

Carole King—Another one previously inducted, as a songwriter with former partner Gerry Goffin. But to ignore Tapestry and the rest of her solo work is unforgivable.

King Crimson—Prog at its most inventive. Whatever you think of the genre on the whole, you must acknowledge that Robert Fripp is a genius.

Kraftwerk—The pioneering German electro-pop/Krautrock band spawned an entire genre. Can they get some credit, please?

Gordon Lightfoot—If fellow Canadians like Neil Young and Joni Mitchell can make the cut, why not this terrific singer-songwriter?

Rock Hall

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland

Little Feat—This L.A. outfit was just so funky, and with the late Lowell George as their lead guitarist they left audiences numb night after night.

Los Lobos—For more than four decades this East L.A. band has continued to innovate. Their output has been consistently strong since day one, and in concert they kill.

Love—Fronted by the gifted singer-songwriter Arthur Lee, this ’60s L.A. band was, for a while, as important to that scene as the Byrds and Buffalo Springfield.

Lonnie Mack—One wicked guitar player, championed by the likes of Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jeff Beck and Duane Allman.

John Mayall—He’s the father of British blues—Clapton, Peter Green and Mick Taylor all came out of his bands. Mayall is still going strong at 82.

MC5—These wild Detroit rockers bucked convention in the late ’60s, mixing hard rock and revolutionary rhetoric—inspiring countless punk bands.

The Meters—They are nothing less than the quintessential New Orleans funk/R&B band. That makes them pretty important, no?

The Monkees—Enough with the “didn’t play their own instruments” excuse. Their records were some of the finest pop-rock of the era, and their influence on the rock video medium was incalculable.

Moody Blues—It’s truly unbelievable that this band, which pioneered symphonic rock and whose records were ubiquitous, has never been nominated.

Mott the Hoople—Just for the fact that they gave us the brilliant Ian Hunter, they belong in. Mott was more than glam; they rocked big-time.

Mountain—Leslie West and company took hard rock to the next level. “Mississippi Queen,” of course, but there was a lot more going on there.

New York Dolls—Seriously, the Dolls are not in? Yes, their whole glam style thing was over the top, but they rocked like crazy and were a major influence on the punk scene.

Watch the Dolls sing “Personality Crisis”

Harry Nilsson—There are still many important singer-songwriters still on the outs, but it’s simply criminal that Nilsson has been ignored. He was loved by the Beatles and just about everyone else.

Phil Ochs—The late singer-songwriter gets stereotyped as a political/protest artist and for sure there was that side of him. But Ochs also wrote insightful love songs and was a keen observer.

Gram Parsons—He should be inducted with the Flying Burrito Brothers and as a solo artist! Synonymous with country-rock.

Teddy Pendergrass—Both with Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes and on his own, he was one of the most dynamic R&B singers.

Poco—Another of the essential country-rock pioneers unjustly ignored.

Iggy PopInducted for the Stooges, but he’s arguably had even more influence as a solo artist.

Billy Preston
—As both sideman and solo artist he was loved by everyone, including, of course, the Beatles. How funky was his “Will It Go Round in Circles”?

Procol Harum—Just for “Whiter Shade of Pale” alone they should get the nod, but they went on to record about a half dozen killer albums after that. And live—wow, especially in the early days with guitarist Robin Trower!

Related: The Rock Hall opens in 1995

Quicksilver Messenger Service—Along with the Dead and the Airplane, QMS defined the San Francisco scene. Give them their due too. Guitarist John Cipollina played like no one else!

Paul Revere and the Raiders—With charismatic frontman Mark Lindsay, they released hit after hit: “Kicks,” “Hungry,” “Just Like Me” and more.

Cliff Richard and the Shadows—Richard was Britain’s reigning pre-Beatles solo artist. His backup band the Shadows influenced the Beatles and everyone else in the U.K. They should each have their own place but we’d be happy to see them honored jointly.

Johnny Rivers—No one reimagined others’ songs as deliciously: “Memphis,” “Secret Agent Man,” “Baby I Need Your Lovin’,” “Summer Rain.” He was a constant presence on the charts for years and still performs today.

Roxy Music—Bryan Ferry and band brought an artsy sophistication to the rock scene, influencing countless bands.

Todd Rundgren—As artist, producer and songwriter, Rundgren has been an indomitable force for decades. How is it possible he hasn’t been inducted yet?

Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels—Rockin’ blue-eyed soul at its finest. “Devil With a Blue Dress On” alone makes him worthy.

Boz Scaggs—The guitarist and singer brought classy stylishness, and a jazzy elegance, to the Bay Area music scene in the ’70s, then expanded beyond that with first-rate albums like Silk Degrees.

The Shangri-Las—They were the toughest of the ’60s girl groups, and their hits like “Leader of the Pack” reflected the angst of growing up teenage and female in their era. Here they are singing “Give Him a Great Big Kiss.”

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Carly Simon—She’ll always be best known for “You’re So Vain” but Simon was a consistently strong singer-songwriter.

Sir Douglas Quintet—The Texas band that revolved around singer-guitarist Doug Sahm had only a few hits but their impact on the Americana movement was felt long after their chart reign ended.

The Spinners—They’ve been around since the ’50s and had major hits (“Then Came You,” “I’ll Be Around”) in the ’70s that still get airplay. It’s time, Hall of Fame!

Steppenwolf—Yes, the band behind “Born to Be Wild” and “Magic Carpet Ride” is still on the outs. What’s up with that?

T. Rex—Singer Marc Bolan was one of the coolest figures—with one of the most unique vocal styles—of the ’70s. Bowie named-checked them in “All the Young Dudes.”

Television—Most of the other big NYC punk-era bands are in but Television predated all of them. Highly influential but someone forgot to tell the Hall.

Ten Years After—Did you ever see the Woodstock movie? Remember watching Alvin Lee shred? That was just a taste.

Joe Tex—Another super soulman of the ’60s who has been unjustly forgotten.

Thin Lizzy—The Irish rockers led by the late Phil Lynott were a whole lot of fun to watch and kicked ass live. “The Boys Are Back in Town” indeed.

Rufus Thomas—From the Stax Records stable that gave us Otis Redding and Booker T. and the MG’s, but he actually began his career in Memphis long before. An R&B giant.

Three Dog Night—If we judge Hall of Fame nominees by the impact they had in their own time, then Three Dog Night deserves a look. Hit after hit after hit.

The Turtles—The L.A. band was one of the few that didn’t use studio musicians, and they came up with “Happy Together,” “She’d Rather be With Me,” “Elenore” and more. That’s impressive.

Watch the Turtles performing “Elenore” live in 1968

Jr. Walker and the All Stars—Walker was the only Motown star who was primarily an instrumentalist. His sax powered hits like “Shotgun” and “Road Runner,” great stuff all.

War—They’ve been nominated but have yet to make the final cut. They fused R&B with funk, rock, jazz and more to create their own sound.

Dionne Warwick—Even just as the premier interpreter of the songs of Burt Bacharach and Hal David, she was a special artist. But there was so much more beyond those.

Barry White—Did you ever hear Barry White’s voice? And if so, can you ever forget Barry White’s voice? Didn’t think so.

Johnny Winter—There was never an artist like him before, and never again will be. A spellbinding guitarist and master performer. Watch him perform “Jumpin’ Jack Flash.”

Steve Winwood—Inducted with Traffic, but he needs to be similarly honored for his solo career.

Link Wray—It’s often said that Wray invented the power chord—a solid decade before most rock bands knew what to do with it. His “Rumble” is one of the most important instrumental hits ever.

Warren Zevon—He’s one of the most beloved singer-songwriters of the past four decades, yet he’s been inexplicably shunned by the Hall. What are you waiting for?!

The Zombies—One of the last of the major British Invasion bands yet to be acknowledged, and one of the best. Colin Blunstone and Rod Argent, back together, sound even better today. Listen to them perform “Time of the Season” just five years ago.

For Part Two, we’ve included several worthy artists from the 1980s. Click here.

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Jeff Tamarkin

Jeff Tamarkin

Best Classic Bands Editor Jeff Tamarkin has been a prolific music journalist for more than four decades. He is formerly the editor of Goldmine, CMJ andRelix magazines, has written for dozens of other publications and has authored liner notes for more than 80 CDs. Jeff has also served on the Nominating Committee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and as a consultant to the Grammys. His first book was 'Got a Revolution! The Turbulent Flight of Jefferson Airplane.' He is also the co-author of 'Shell Shocked: My Life with the Turtles, Flo and Eddie, and Frank Zappa, etc.,' with Howard Kaylan.
Jeff Tamarkin
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  1. Nilssonian
    #1 Nilssonian 16 October, 2016, 14:45

    Harry Nilsson’s songs have been covered by dozens of artists making him a very influential force in the history of rock.

    Reply this comment
  2. Mary
    #2 Mary 16 October, 2016, 14:50

    I sincerely thank you for the nod.

    Lead singer The Shangri-Las.

    Mary Weiss

    Reply this comment
    • Jeff Tamarkin
      Jeff Tamarkin Author 16 October, 2016, 16:49

      Thanks for your thanks, Mary! I saw the Shangs in 1965 at one of the beach clubs on Long Island! I’ve always loved those records. And your recent solo album is terrific!

      Reply this comment
  3. MK
    #3 MK 16 October, 2016, 16:07

    Although they were not my favorite bands, Three Dog Night, The Guess Who and Grand Funk Railroad dominated 70x radio with hit after hit.
    One of my all time faves is Huey Smith. He’ll never get in and as far as piano players go, he is second only to Little Richard.

    Reply this comment
    • juniebjones
      juniebjones 16 October, 2016, 17:24

      I cannot believe some of these omissions. i stopped paying attention a long time ago, when bands I didn’t really deem worthy started getting in, but no King Crimson, Todd Rundgren, Jethro Tull, Harry Nilsson? I could go on and on after looking at this list. What a diservice.

      Reply this comment
    • Mark
      Mark 17 October, 2016, 00:35

      How about America? They also dominated in the 70’s

      Reply this comment
  4. dmg
    #4 dmg 16 October, 2016, 17:17

    Great list!!

    Here are a few that I’d probably include in my own list:

    J.J. Cale: Father of the Tulsa Sound. Two of Eric Clapton’s biggest hits belong to him, as does one of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s. He’s been covered countless times, by not just the aforementioned Clapton and Skynyrd, but by artists like Santana, Kansas, Poco, Johnny Cash, and John Mayer. Artists ranging from Eric Clapton to Dire Straits to Beck and John Mayer cite him as an influence.

    Big Maybelle: She was doin’ a whole lotta shakin’ before Jerry Lee Lewis. Could be an Early Influence candidate.

    Nina Simone: The High Priestess of Soul. Not just highly influential musically, but a key musical figure in the Civil Rights movement by telling it how it is. She didn’t give a *&%^, and it doesn’t get more rock & roll than that. Many artists cite her as an influence, including John Legend, Aretha Franklin, Janis Joplin, Sade, Alicia Keys, Elton John, Mary J. Blige… the list goes on and on. Even John Lennon has cited her as an influence on at least one occasion.

    Big Mama Thornton: Incalculable influence on rock, blues, and soul. Just ask Elvis. And Janis.

    Sister Rosetta Tharpe: As Early Influence, but it’s still mind-boggling that they haven’t included her. Rock & roll likely flat-out wouldn’t exist with out her – at least not the way that we know it. From Chuck Berry to Little Richard to Aretha Franklin to Tina Turner to Meat Loaf – her influence spreads far and wide.

    Also, props for including John Mayall. He’s an extremely influential figure that many overlook. Past Bluesbreakers also include Mick Fleetwood, Paul Butterfield, and Harvey Mandel.

    Reply this comment
    • Jeff Tamarkin
      Jeff Tamarkin Author 16 October, 2016, 20:14

      Some great names there! I’d love to see Nina Simone, especially, get that recognition but I’m not sure she means a lot to the rock crowd. Sister Rosetta, whew! She seriously needs to be in. As far as Mayall, Butterfield was never a part of the Bluesbreakers but you’re right about Fleetwood (AND John McVie) and Mandel.

      Reply this comment
    • Mike L
      Mike L 10 March, 2017, 22:50

      Seriously agree with Sister Rosetta Tharpe..there was no one like her and she held her own alongside Muddy Waters and many other blues greats. Hope ya caught the tribute they did to her last summer at Arts at Brookfield. It was awesome. Luther Dickinson, John Medeski, AJ Ghent, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Valerie June and a host of others had the place rockin for free in downtown Manhattan.

      Reply this comment
    • horned norseman
      horned norseman 3 April, 2017, 22:12

      great list!! for j.j. cale alone!!but i sit in total disbelief that rory gallagher is not mentioned anywhere in this article or by any of the commenters??? c’MONNN… 🙂

      Reply this comment
  5. the oracle
    #5 the oracle 16 October, 2016, 18:12

    Suzi Quatro – the FIRST female rocker to break through internationally. Sold 45 million records worldwide – arguably the most influential female musician of the 70’s…. and nary a mention. The ‘expert’ writer must have had a brain fart when compiling this one.

    Reply this comment
  6. geoff
    #6 geoff 16 October, 2016, 18:34

    Little Feat has continued to evolve as a band, continuing to this day, long after the passing of the amazing Lowell George. They are the best!

    Reply this comment
  7. Cj
    #7 Cj 16 October, 2016, 19:24

    REO Speedwagon. Their earlier song were alot more hard and edgier. Then they went main stream and invented the Power Ballad and Arena Rock. With the death of Gary Richrath last year who wrote many of their hits. They, after almost 50 years, still bring it.

    Reply this comment
  8. anon
    #8 anon 16 October, 2016, 20:37

    the monkees need to be in as an early boy band

    Reply this comment
    • Guy Smiley
      Guy Smiley 17 October, 2016, 22:05

      That’s not a reason they need to be in. The Monkees need to be in the Hall because the music was (mostly) great, and were a lot more than just their hit singles (check out the Headquarters album, as well as Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd, and – best of all – the Head soundtrack). Not to mention being music video pioneers, of course.

      Also, the “didn’t play their instruments” thing is a lie. It’s true they weren’t allowed to at first, but they later did, and always did on tour. Hell, Micky Dolenz played the first Moog synthesizer to appear on a pop/rock album!

      Most of all, their music has endured. 50 years later, we’re still talking about The Monkees, people are still coming out to see them (in whatever combinations) on tour, and they delivered one of 2016’s best albums with the wonderful “Good Times!”

      Reply this comment
      • Jeff Tamarkin
        Jeff Tamarkin Author 17 October, 2016, 22:11

        Good Times is one of the best albums of this year. Unlike some of the other artists who’ve been inducted, the Monkees continue to make exciting new music.

        Reply this comment
        • Guy Smiley
          Guy Smiley 18 October, 2016, 20:11

          Indeed! And it should be noted that, along with Nesmith’s excellent compositions (and a handful of strong Dolenz and Tork originals) all the other great writers who wrote songs for The Monkees. Carole King and Neil Diamond are in… But how about Harry Nilsson? He should be in too.

          And, given the acclaim Good Times! got, I really thought this would be the year. Apparently their influencing the likes of Andy Partridge, Ben Gibbard, Noel Gallagher, etc., didn’t matter? How about Tom Petty, Elvis Costello, and Michael Stipe then? They’re all on record as being fans (Peter Buck too, apparently!).

          Reply this comment
  9. Howie
    #9 Howie 16 October, 2016, 21:51

    What about the BEST female ROCK artist of the 80’s and STILL to this day ~ Pat Benatar?
    She is well overdue for an induction!

    Reply this comment
    • Guy Smiley
      Guy Smiley 18 October, 2016, 20:04

      Hard to believe Heart got in before Benatar. Then again, as this article points out, the Shangri-las haven’t made it in either. Total shame.

      Reply this comment
  10. Tony
    #10 Tony 16 October, 2016, 22:55

    Patti LaBelle & The Bluebelles/Labelle

    These women have made music since 1962. Collectively and individually, Patti LaBelle, Nona Hendryx and Sarah Dash have made amazing music for over 50 years mixing R&B/rock/gospel/dance/avant garde. They made a big impact in the 70’s, and are more than “Lady Marmalade”. They have been very overlooked, and have as yet never even been nominated.

    Reply this comment
  11. Patrick
    #11 Patrick 16 October, 2016, 23:23

    Good read! I agree with about 90% of the names. Where was Styx, Scorpions, Foghat, Boston, Def Leppard, Motorhead, Dire Straits, REO Speedwagon, Toto, Wishbone Ash, Iron Maiden, Kansas?! They also need some love!

    Reply this comment
  12. Patrick
    #12 Patrick 16 October, 2016, 23:31

    Good read! I agree with about 90% of the names. Where was Styx, Scorpions, Foghat, Boston, Def Leppard, Motorhead, Dire Straits, REO Speedwagon, Toto, Iron Maiden, Supertramp, Kansas?!

    Reply this comment
    • tom
      tom 17 October, 2016, 10:34

      Amen..all staples of a.m. radio growing up in 70’s with hit after hit.

      Reply this comment
  13. TODD TAMANEND CLARK
    #13 TODD TAMANEND CLARK 16 October, 2016, 23:33

    More psychedelia and proto-electronica please — IRON BUTTERFLY, LOTHAR AND THE HAND PEOPLE, SILVER APPLES, THE AMBOY DUKES, THE BLUES MAGOOS, THE ELECTRIC PRUNES, THE FUGS, THE MUSIC MACHINE, THE RED KRAYOLA, THE SEEDS, THE STRAWBERRY ALARM CLOCK, THE THIRTEENTH FLOOR ELEVATORS, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VANILLA FUDGE…

    Reply this comment
  14. Rev
    #14 Rev 17 October, 2016, 02:58

    And what about Connie Francis??? It’s just an atrocity that she has not been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame! She was the first & innovator who paved the way for all subsequent female pop/rock singers, also accomplished recording her songs in numerous languages.

    Reply this comment
  15. keither22
    #15 keither22 17 October, 2016, 04:53

    Great list Mark, but IMHO there can be no excuse for the ecxluson of The Moody Blues (very beautiful and unique British band), Jethro Tull (and their incredible LP’s and live performances.
    And not but not least, The Dire Straits. HOW can any one listen to their LP’s and not recognize greatness? They make some of the actual nominees (Mellencamp), etc, silly in comparison.
    –Keith, NYC

    Reply this comment
  16. Simon
    #16 Simon 17 October, 2016, 05:15

    A couple more influential musicians should be on the list are Rory Gallagher and Steve Morse

    Reply this comment
  17. Simon
    #17 Simon 17 October, 2016, 05:17

    Rory Gallagher and Steve Morse are a couple more guitarists who should be in this list.

    Reply this comment
  18. Blues Specialist
    #18 Blues Specialist 17 October, 2016, 06:38

    What about Marshall Tucker Band? They created unbelievable music with classics such as Cant You See, Heard it in a Love Song, Fire on the Mountain, Searching for a Rainbow and many others. And the only other band besides Jethro Full to rock the flute! Awesome blend of rock, country, jazz and jam band.

    Reply this comment
  19. Alan Roach
    #19 Alan Roach 17 October, 2016, 08:44

    Excellent list. One group that hasn’t been given the recognition and respect that they absolutely deserve is The Osmonds. Over 100 Million records sold, Multiple Peoples Choice Awards, sold out arenas and still touring after 55 years in the biz, The Osmonds have earned a legit spot in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

    Reply this comment
  20. dan
    #20 dan 17 October, 2016, 09:40

    I believe a compelling case for “Fugazi” can be made. They are incredibly influential and were the conscience of many bands (see eddie vedder for instance). It would also be funny to give such a crass and commercial award to them.

    Reply this comment
  21. tom
    #21 tom 17 October, 2016, 10:40

    Very very pleased to see this common sense list of deserving rockers and others from 60’s to 70’s. So much talent, style plus substance. Many like Joe Cocker, Moody Blues, Doobie Bros, Zombies are no brainers. Forget about who is trendy now, Hall inductions should be based on merit and achievement and influence, not
    just popularity. Nothing wrong with mainstream top 40 rockers going in over fringe groups who brought something new to the table. Great list..very happy you posted this!

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    • Jack
      Jack 1 August, 2017, 01:07

      Tom, I agree 100%. Unfortunately, The Hall has made a very dangerous turn onto the road of “Hype”, instead of staying on the “Quality, Talent Ave.”. I think sometimes the go with names that will bring in customers to the Hall. There are definitely some glaring omissions.

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  22. mudhead
    #22 mudhead 17 October, 2016, 12:05

    I would love to see Al Kooper, Taj Mahal and NRBQ added to this list.

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  23. scott
    #23 scott 17 October, 2016, 12:18

    Joe Jackson is a significant omission.

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  24. Joeybombstyle
    #24 Joeybombstyle 17 October, 2016, 13:19

    I’ve given up on the whole Rock and Roll Hall of fame thing it is the Rolling Stone Hall of Fame that being said that actually widens the scope with out having to listen to people balk everytime a “they’re not rock” artist goes in. It’s still fun and should still be seen as a cool accompliment. I agree with everyone you have up there but the ones that I see as a total crime are Thin Lizzy The Damned Billy Preston Crystals Dick Dale Judas Priest Ben E King The Shangri Las and the band that I feel should sit with the big 2 of their time period The Zomies if it was not for bad luck etc they would have been one of the biggest bands in the world.

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  25. Dan
    #25 Dan 17 October, 2016, 14:13

    Randy Bachman, the guess who and bto were#1… this guy being left out is poor.

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  26. MikeMac
    #26 MikeMac 17 October, 2016, 15:00

    HOW COULD YOU NOT LIST NRBQ????

    Reply this comment
    • Jeff Tamarkin
      Jeff Tamarkin Author 17 October, 2016, 20:02

      Hey MikeMac, NRBQ is my favorite live band of all time! I probably saw them 25 or more times. But I had to be realistic and acknowledge that there is no way they are going to get nominated by the Hall of Fame. I wish things were different because they certainly deserve it, but it’s just not going to happen. And if it ever does, I’ll be happy to be proven wrong!

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  27. garjen
    #27 garjen 17 October, 2016, 16:12

    I would also recommend for this list Pete Townshend (solo) here are his Top 100 solo songs http://supergroup.netfirms.com/index7.htm

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  28. Linda Jane
    #28 Linda Jane 17 October, 2016, 16:31

    It is good to see Electric Light Orchestra in the running. ELO brought such a unique sound to rock music. Truly one of the best symphonic rock bands!

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  29. Rich P
    #29 Rich P 17 October, 2016, 16:39

    Hard to believe you left Neil Sedaka and Connie Francis off your list. They dominated the male and female charts from 58 through the entry of the Beatle in ’64. Plus Sedaka’s comeback in ’75 featured three No. 1s.

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  30. TJ
    #30 TJ 17 October, 2016, 17:56

    I have always subscribed to the notion that the RRHOF consists of two parts – “Rock & Roll” and “hall of FAME”. You MUST rock and you MUST be famous! This is not supposed to be the “Hall of Pretty Good”.Using that criteria, go through the list and only make note of those artists listed who “ROCK” and are “FAMOUS”. Of course, if you use that criteria retroactively, Wenner would have to remove 3/4 of the folk, jazz, pop, doo wop, country and other “NON ROCK” people currently members. It’s really a joke trying to button-hole one genre anyway in this field. As long as Paul Revere & the Raiders and the Guess Who are outside looking in, the whole debate is a joke.

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  31. GGG
    #31 GGG 17 October, 2016, 17:57

    Zappa!

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  32. Patti
    #32 Patti 17 October, 2016, 19:43

    Three Dog Night For absolutely sure!

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  33. Hapster
    #33 Hapster 17 October, 2016, 22:47

    What about Bryan Adams? Summer of 69, Cuts Like a Knife, Run to You are rock classics. So he wrote a few cheesy love songs…so did Rod Stewart and Elton John and they’re in!

    Reply this comment
    • Greg Brodsky
      Greg Brodsky 18 October, 2016, 00:48

      Thanks for your comment. As the article states: “All of our picks made their debut recording earlier than 1980.”

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  34. Billy.
    #34 Billy. 18 October, 2016, 03:03

    ELO, Moody Blues, Thin Lizzy, Bad Company “I caught their show Fri night” unbelievable!!!!, Bad Finger….all truly deserving a place at this table years ago, never mind now. The Carpenters?!!!!!!! Karen, probably the most beautiful voice of all time…..But Rock N Roll?!!! WTF?

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  35. Cyberdale
    #35 Cyberdale 18 October, 2016, 09:23

    ELO would not have existed without The Move. Roy Wood’s guitar and songwriting chops made the band, Carl Wayne is one of rock’s great forgotten vocalists and when Jeff Lynne joined they had a real two-headed monster.

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  36. Rob
    #36 Rob 18 October, 2016, 10:16

    Darlene Love is and was great but she was never in The Crystals

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    • Jeff Tamarkin
      Jeff Tamarkin Author 18 October, 2016, 13:52

      Technically you are correct but Spector used her as lead vocalist on Crystals hits such as “He’s a Rebel” and “He’s Sure the Boy I Love.”

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  37. Terry
    #37 Terry 18 October, 2016, 14:46

    BIG STAR!

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  38. Ridi James
    #38 Ridi James 18 October, 2016, 18:06

    Even here, on the list of omitted rock band, you’ve omitted America, who wrote, sang and even produced some of the most enduring hits in American music. Man, Rodney Dangerfield was never treated like this.

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  39. Thefen
    #39 Thefen 19 October, 2016, 08:28

    If Cat Stevens can be inducted as he was 2 years ago, so should Gordon Lightfoot and Harry Chapin! Both for their bodies of music, plus Harry Chapins’ philanthropic predates Live-Aid!

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    • Tom From Pgh
      Tom From Pgh 20 March, 2017, 22:57

      Here’s the problem with the whole process, I respect Gordon Lightfoot’s work & am a huge Harry Chapin fan, but Im not sure they are R&RHOF worthy. However, when you induct James Taylor & Cat Stevens how do you then ignore the other two ? Chapin was a prolific performer, writing a Broadway play, composing all the music for his brother’s TV show, composed scores for multiple TV movies, while recording 9 albums in 10 years around over 2,000 live concerts & countless TV appearances. “Cat’s In The Cradle” is a cultural touchstone even 40 years later, “Taxi” was one of the most requested songs of the decade in the 70s, he had 7 albums that were just under or over the Gold Record Sales Threshold, yet not Im not convinced he’s “rock” – although if you are inducting Cat Stevens, then how do you explain not even considering Lightfoot & Chapin ?

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  40. BillH
    #40 BillH 21 October, 2016, 09:46

    How about King Crimson, Renaissance, Foreigner, Free, B-52’s, Clannad, The Crusaders, Gentle Giant, Jean-Luc Ponty, Lou Gramm, Stuff and Supertramp.

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  41. Carole
    #41 Carole 29 November, 2016, 20:57

    I can’t believe that Neil Sedaka and Connie Francis were even overlooked on this list of overlooked RRHOF candidates!

    Sedaka’s songwriting credits alone qualify him before the addition of his early pop idol/vocalist status. Connie Francis churned out a ton of hits and was arguably pop-rock’s first big female star.

    Shame on the RRHOF for missing these two key artists.

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  42. stephen cabral
    #42 stephen cabral 23 December, 2016, 10:46

    Really? No J. Geils Band?

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  43. frankj
    #43 frankj 28 December, 2016, 11:42

    Great list, agree with all your selections but should add Nick Drake.

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  44. Jackieblue22 in CT
    #44 Jackieblue22 in CT 14 January, 2017, 21:26

    Great list! …and bless you for including the Moody Blues!

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  45. Gary
    #45 Gary 15 January, 2017, 09:54

    Wow. No Marshall Tucker Band mention. Sad.

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  46. itln4fox
    #46 itln4fox 6 February, 2017, 12:33

    Burt Bacharach should be in. Two artists owe their induction solely to him–Gene Pitney and Dusty Springfield. How much more influential could you be?

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  47. Dave
    #47 Dave 5 March, 2017, 07:05

    Comment text.. The Hollies another great band and many singles.

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  48. Mike Lenowsky
    #48 Mike Lenowsky 10 March, 2017, 23:13

    Great lists..1 and 2..
    Plus a bunch of other mentions by the commenters. Hard to believe so many greats aren’t in though Pearl Jam is. I don’t think any 90s bands should be let in until so many of these wrongs are righted! And thank you for mentioning Phish..truly the best big live band out there doing like The Dead did it..changing nightly..no two shows the same..but very different from The Dead who I’m an even bigger fan of. It personally sickens me that The Meters were up for induction the last handful of years but didn’t get in. They’re pretty much the only band I’d wanna see more than The Dead..in any formation..and they’re still kicking ass..mostly as The Funky Meters..but still..they were the backing band on Lady Marmalade and were loved by Paul McCartney, The Stones and influenced a generation of funk, rock and jambands. As well as George Porter jr. Is hands down the best bass player alive..in my humble opinion!

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  49. Billy K.
    #49 Billy K. 3 April, 2017, 17:46

    Lots of good choices for sure, and most that I agree with…….

    But some overlooked people…..
    Tower of Power…..R&B artists in their own right….but played on many rock sessions.

    Alexis Korner—not a household name in America, but his nightclub spawned a bunch of well-known bands.

    Petula Clark—some people have their reasons about Connie Francis, Lesley Gore, Dusty Springfield….but I believe that Petula has just a strong a case.

    New Order—innovators in techno.

    And various non-performers who have contributed much(behind the scenes) to Rock and Roll: Jack Douglas, Joe Meek, Bob Ezrin, Ted Templeman, Irving Azoff.

    Can journalists get inducted? Strong case for the late Cub Coda.

    Reply this comment
    • Jeff Tamarkin
      Jeff Tamarkin Author 3 April, 2017, 18:04

      Great choices. Petula Clark is noted in the second part of our list (there’s a link near the bottom of part one). Tower of Power and Alexis Korner are deserving for sure. And, as mentioned earlier, it’s absurd that Al Kooper is not in.

      New Order? Maybe at some point–hard to say. Maybe Joy Division before them though?

      The Hall is very random on the non-performers. All of the people you mentioned are important and there are dozens more. Mostly, the Hall’s leaders have inducted themselves, not too many other industry people.

      Journalists can and should get inducted. Cub Koda was a good friend and colleague but I doubt he’ll ever get in. They’re kore likely to put in someone like Lester Bangs or, again, some of the people who are on the nominating committee.

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  50. DJTom
    #50 DJTom 4 April, 2017, 21:00

    I’ll tell you one nobody has mentioned, been together since 1961, still rocking to This Day! 26 studio albums, 12 live albums, several compilations. Sold millions of albums. They have evolved through the years, yet remained true to their roots as a kick ass live act. I nominate Golden Earring and why they aren’t in shows what little “critics” know about music.

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  51. Sabu
    #51 Sabu 29 April, 2017, 01:35

    Johnny Maestro /Crests/Brooklyn Bridge. The Belmonts

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  52. BIWJ
    #52 BIWJ 30 April, 2017, 18:10

    Great list, Jeff. Especially glad to see you mention Badfinger, Peter Frampton, Tommy James & The Shondells, Moody Blues, Poco, The Zombies. All beyond worthy.

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  53. Stbarts
    #53 Stbarts 25 June, 2017, 22:07

    Quite an impressive list . But you forgot David Cassidy . He had a bigger following and concerts than Elvis and The Beatles in the early 70’s . Biggest fan club ever . Yes he was handsome but a great artist and actor as well . He needs to be on the list

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  54. Willem
    #54 Willem 27 June, 2017, 16:48

    Thanks for the great list! That Little Feat and Los Lobos are not in is criminal. Not to mention that we need more “L” bands in the Hall!

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  55. micky
    #55 micky 27 June, 2017, 18:03

    reading your list , i think i like more bands not in the hall of fame than are included ! obviously , i have different criteria , so i’ll leave it at that . one thing though , i’d go for the nice before elp .

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  56. GnLguy
    #56 GnLguy 17 August, 2017, 16:25

    You gotta be kidding me!!!! After all of the great music that Kim Simmonds and Savoy has churned out over the years and Kim being one of the greatest blues rock guitarist alive – they aren’t mentioned in this list????
    And I look further – and Robin Trower isn’t on this list either????

    How is one to take this article serious when you omit such musician’s as these??

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  57. Jack
    #57 Jack 21 August, 2017, 05:32

    The line-up of those not inducted into the Hall, for the most part, is better than the list of acts that have been inducted.

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  58. Fredbob
    #58 Fredbob 2 October, 2017, 18:01

    How about spirit. The guys could play all styles of music easily and were all top notch musicians. Their first four albums wete all classics.

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  59. Dan
    #59 Dan 3 October, 2017, 04:42

    Chubby Checker, I would have thought, would have been in the first group of inductees. His list of hits dominated the charts in the 60s. He created the whole dance music genre! Every wedding DJ has the Twist on their playlist. And the Limbo, Pony, and Hucklebuck- what does the Hall have against him?

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  60. Guidopm7
    #60 Guidopm7 9 October, 2017, 16:53

    America, Karla Bonoff, Boston, Foreigner, Frampton, Toto, Zevon…these were the 70’s!

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