Album Rewinds

Given the test of time and the wisdom of hindsight, how do significant albums from the past sound and play today? Our critics take a second look from a fresh perspective

Deep Purple ‘Machine Head’: Rockin’ in Montreux

The 1972 album, cut by their classic lineup, made them big stars, and they soon toured the world. And there was much more to it than “Smoke on the Water.”

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The Doors’ ‘L.A. Woman’: Last Call

The Doors’ sixth and final studio LP re-energized the band through a return to their roots in American blues, and served as a tribute to their hometown.

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Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young’s ‘Deja Vu’: A Volatile Chemistry

By any standard, it was an enormous success. But when CSN added a new member for their second album, it was an alliance that would both define and bedevil them

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The Paul McCartney Solo Debut: His Declaration of Independence

The 1970 album, his first outside of the Beatles, is a picture of Paul in transition, a historical document of quiet beauty.

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Willie Nelson ‘Stardust’: Reimagining the American Songbook

His record label was reluctant to issue it, but the album defied expectations and revived interest in the classic songwriting of the mid-20th century.

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Manassas: Stephen Stills’ Finest (Solo) Hour

Stills’ third full-length as leader showcased a collaborative ensemble flexible enough to cover a broad stylistic palette.

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Bob Seger ‘Live Bullet’: Old Time Rock ‘n’ Roll

Although he was a star locally, the Detroit rocker had been struggling for years to break out nationally—until he formed the Silver Bullet Band.

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Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass’ ‘Whipped Cream & Other Delights’: Sweet & Swinging

The faux mariachi-style LP spent three years on the charts and appealed to seemingly every category of record buyer.

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Ray Charles’ Soulful Country Music’: ‘It’s Got to Move Me’

Charles: “The words to country songs are very earthy like the blues, very down.”

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Jim Croce ‘You Don’t Mess Around With Jim’: An Everyman Arrives

With more time, he might have taken his place as an equal of James Taylor, Gordon Lightfoot, Paul Simon, etc.

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