Album Rewinds

Given the test of time and the wisdom of hindsight, how do significant albums from the past sound and play today? Our critics take a second look from a fresh perspective

Genesis’ ‘The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway’: Peter Gabriel’s Theatrical Exit

For their 1974 prog opus, Gabriel and the band came up with a complicated and somewhat opaque ‘urban odyssey’ tale set in New York City.

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Bob Dylan’s Masterful ‘Blood on the Tracks’ Revisited

After finishing the recording sessions for his new album, the artist decided he didn’t like some of it and went back into the studio. A classic emerged.

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Pretenders’ Debut: Chrissie Hynde Takes No Prisoners

Released at the edge of the ’70s punk and new wave assaults, ‘Pretenders’ traded on Chrissie Hynde’s substantial punk bona fides–but there was more to it.

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Joni Mitchell’s ‘Court and Spark’: A Significant Pivot

Her 1974 best-seller was adorned by a sophisticated sonic sensibility that would define her career from that moment forward.

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Pat Benatar’s ‘Crimes of Passion’: Her Best Shot

She has remained the thing she set out to be, an artist who made her own seat at the table and turned it into a remarkable rock music legacy.

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Harry Nilsson’s Ambitious ‘Schmilsson’ LP Revisited

Noteworthy for its scope and ambition, the album was justifiably rewarded with worldwide success that took Nilsson to the next level of stardom.

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Free’s ‘Fire and Water’: More Than Just All Right

The album featured one of rock’s all-time classics in “All Right Now,” but there was much more to Free’s ferocious-yet-controlled ethic.

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When Johnny Cash Did Time ‘At Folsom Prison’

Performing for prison inmates was nothing new for the legendary singer, but his record label was nervous about making an album at one. Good thing they did.

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Pink Floyd’s ‘Later Years’ Box: We Don’t Need No Roger Waters

‘The Later Years’ isn’t for casual fans. But if you’re a serious Floyd follower, it’s probably time to hand over your credit card.

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Elvis Costello’s ‘Armed Forces’: What’s So Funny?

The band’s third album was a leap forward in songcraft and sonic ambition, a song cycle weaving the personal and political.

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