Album Rewinds

Given the test of time and the wisdom of hindsight, how do significant albums from the past sound and play today? Our critics take a second look from a fresh perspective

The Flying Burrito Bros.’ Seminal Country-Rock Debut

Gram Parsons had envisioned the Burritos as “his” band, but ‘The Gilded Palace of Sin’ underscores the partnership between Parsons and Chris Hillman.

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Pretenders’ Debut: Chrissie Hynde Takes No Prisoners

Released at the edge of the ’70s punk and new wave assaults, ‘Pretenders’ traded on Chrissie Hynde’s substantial punk bona fides–but there was more to it.

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Love’s Brilliant Landmark ‘Forever Changes’

The deeper complexity and nuance that had lurked under the surface came to the forefront in the L.A. band’s classic 1967 third album.

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‘Ringo’: His 1973 Solo Breakthrough, With a Little Help From You Know Who

Although he’d had a couple of solo hits post-Beatles, the albums just weren’t happening. Then he reached into his phone book and made a few calls.

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‘Wildflowers’: Tom Petty’s Heartbroken Solo Masterpiece

Petty called it his favorite album. Its generous song list only hinted at the virtual torrent of material he was creating during this period.

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Lou Reed’s ‘New York’ Dramatically Expanded: Review

People say write about what you know, and man, did Reed know New York’s undercurrents, which serve as the subject of some of this album’s best tracks.

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Kansas’ ‘Leftoverture’: A Prog/Arena Rock Magnum Opus

Their fourth album made Kansas one of the top U.S. mainstream rock bands and helped pave the way for the style now known as “arena rock.”

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Rickie Lee Jones’ Debut: Hipster Chic, Beyond Laurel Canyon

She reached beyond folk, rock and blues influences then dominant among Los Angeles’ singer-songwriters, looking to earlier generations of songsmiths.

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Bill Withers’ ‘Live at Carnegie Hall’: Soul Preachin’

He’d never even planned for a career in music. Before long, he found himself on stage at one of the most prestigious performance venues in the world.

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The Allman Brothers Band’s ‘Eat a Peach’: Farewell to a Brother

Started before the death of Duane Allman, and completed after he was gone, the album served as a poignant, multifaceted farewell to the guitar great.

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