Posts From Jeff Tamarkin

Dave Clark on ‘All the Hits’: ‘The Imperfections Made Them Perfect’

“We believed the song should have that same excitement of when we played live,” says Dave Clark, on recording the big DC5 hits like “Glad All Over.”

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Jefferson Starship in the ’70s: How They Were Born and Nearly Died in 4 Short Years

From the time Marty Balin reunited with former bandmates Grace Slick and Paul Kantner, the hits came fast. But then things went south, quickly.

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Blues Image’s ‘Ride Captain Ride’: A Tale of 73 Men

The singer and the keyboardist were having trouble coming up with a lead lyric for the new song they were writing. The answer was sitting right in front of them.

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The Rolling Stones Bring Howlin’ Wolf to U.S. TV

From the start they were huge fans of the blues. So when the British band had the chance to present one of their idols on American TV, they grabbed it.

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Peter Frampton Interview: Still Very Much Alive!

He recorded one of the best-selling albums in history, and he’s proud of it. But what really makes him happy is being acknowledged as a great guitarist.

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Sonny & Cher’s ‘The Beat Goes On’ (& On & On)…

A breakdown of the way things used to be vs. the inevitable winds of change, it gave them their third major hit. But some things, it seemed, never changed.

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Gerry Rafferty, ‘Baker Street,’ and That Sax Solo!

The smash hit was written while its author was hanging out in a flat in London, trying to escape from frustrating legal proceedings.

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‘In the Year 2525’: The Gloomiest #1?

It was, to be sure, one of the bleakest songs ever to hit #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. And then Zager and Evans never charted again.

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Melanie Remembers Woodstock: ‘I Left My Body’

She was only 22 and a relative unknown when she walked onto the stage at Yasgur’s Farm and sang for half a million people. By the end of her set, she was a star.

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1975—The Year in 50 Classic Rock Albums

Don’t let anyone tell you the mid-’70s was a dull period for music—a simple survey of what we were listening to disproves that notion.

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