Posts From Sam Sutherland

Traffic’s ‘John Barleycorn Must Die’: Forward into the Past

Begun as a Steve Winwood solo project, the album morphed into a Traffic reunion with the addition of Jim Capaldi and Chris Wood to the fold.

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‘Let It Bleed’: The Rolling Stones’ Turbulent Masterpiece

The album captures the band at its creative apogee through a dark masterpiece that mirrors the violent ’60s milieu in which it was created.

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Bob Marley and the Wailers’ ‘Live!’ Album: Reggae Rocks Babylon

The London concert providedvalidation that Marley and his band, the Wailers, had breached the rock market with their potent strain of reggae.

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‘Slowhand’ Revisited: Eric Clapton’s 1977 Platinum Balancing Act

‘Slowhand’ offers a lucid balance of technical mastery and artistic modesty. It became his best-selling studio album to date upon its release.

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Jackson Browne’s 1st LP: An L.A. Troubadour with Greenwich Village Connections

Several of his songs, written when he was still in his teens, had already been recorded by others by the time Browne entered the studio to cut his debut.

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Dr. John’s ‘Gumbo’: A New Orleans Master’s Thesis

For the sessions, instead of his own new material, he breathed authentic life into lively new versions of hometown classics.

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Traffic’s ‘The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys’: Rock on the Fusion Frontier

What had begun as post-‘Sgt. Pepper’ psychedelia turned toward a darker, more idiosyncratic synthesis of jazz, blues, world music and English folk elements.

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The Flying Burrito Bros.’ Seminal Country-Rock Debut

Gram Parsons had envisioned the Burritos as “his” band, but ‘The Gilded Palace of Sin’ underscores the partnership between Parsons and Chris Hillman.

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Pretenders’ Debut: Chrissie Hynde Takes No Prisoners

Released at the edge of the ’70s punk and new wave assaults, ‘Pretenders’ traded on Chrissie Hynde’s substantial punk bona fides–but there was more to it.

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‘Wildflowers’: Tom Petty’s Heartbroken Solo Masterpiece

Petty called it his favorite album. Its generous song list only hinted at the virtual torrent of material he was creating during this period.

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