Posts From Mark Leviton

Elvis Costello and the Attractions’ ‘Get Happy!!’: Stack of Tracks

The album is packed with “20 original hits by the original artist,” some of the most intense, gut-wrenching, clever and joyfully sad songs he ever wrote

Read More

Paul McCartney’s Solo Debut: Declaration of Independence

The 1970 album, his first outside of the Beatles, is a picture of Paul in transition, a historical document of quiet beauty.

Read More

Vanilla Fudge’s 1967 Debut: Maximum Psychedelia

It was rock music pushed to its limits, with a radical use of soft-loud-soft dynamics and the emotional drama of rhythm and blues and soul.

Read More

ZZ Top’s ‘Eliminator’: Hot-Rods, TV Dinners and Sharp-Dressed Men

The music is stellar, and the LP became a massive hit, selling 10 million copies and staying on the Billboard album chart for three years.

Read More

Cat Stevens’ ‘Teaser And the Firecat’: A Singer-Songwriter Classic

With hit songs like “Moonshadow,” “Peace Train” and “Morning Has Broken,” the singer-songwriter became a star, lighting up pop radio.

Read More

Todd Rundgren’s ‘A Wizard, A True Star’: Brilliant & Baffling

Was Todd’s against-the-grain psychedelic album a masterpiece or a slab of unintelligible self-indulgence? We look back at a ’70s classic.

Read More

Queen’s ‘Sheer Heart Attack’: The Breakthrough

Wildly theatrical, straddling the worlds of hard rock, pop, prog and Broadway, the album was an eclectic triumph. Now, Queen sounded like a true band.

Read More

Yes’ ‘The Yes Album’ @50: Brilliance Under Pressure

Their record label was looking for commercial progress in order to justify keeping them under contract. This 1971 classic put the band on the prog map.

Read More

Graham Parker’s ‘Squeezing Out Sparks’: Simple As a Heartbeat

The 1979 album doesn’t have a weak song or performance, and continues to be cited as the British singer-songwriter’s greatest achievement.

Read More

The Kinks’ ‘Sleepwalker’: The Comeback

The album kept selling to teenagers who barely remembered the Kinks of the previous decade, or thought they were a new band.

Read More